Memories of Prof. Reg Daniel | Ever Loved

Notifications

No notifications
We will send an invite after you submit!
Helping hands

In lieu of flowers

In lieu of flowers, consider a gift to Professor G. Reginald Daniel Memorial Fund.
Help keep everyone in the know by sharing this memorial website.
In memory of Prof. Reg Daniel

Memories & condolences

Year (Optional)
Location (Optional)
Caption
YouTube/Facebook/Vimeo Link
Caption
Who is in this photo?
Or start with a template for inspiration
Cancel
This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.
I just saw the post on Critically Mixed Race Studies' fb page, of Reg's death.  I'm sorry I missed the event yesterday.  I met him, maybe, in '94.  I was writing my master's thesis on mixed race (Anglo & Mex) in El Paso, Texas, but being from the Bay Area I learned of the course taught at UC Berkeley and from there of this man at UCLA.  It started with these long phone conversations, where he'd have to munch on something as 'it was the only way this is going to work.'  We ended up having dinner in LA, his ecological base, which he saw as difficult to give up.  I attend one of his classes.  His students loved him, though also saw the final assignment as daunting.  When he spoke of the possibility of UCSB, I wasn't sure it was going to work out.  But later visiting him there, he seemed very at home.  He was always so attentive to our conversations.
All ways ,always a Mutual Adm…
Santa Barbara, CA, USA
All ways ,always a Mutual Admiration
Thank you so much for allowing us to tune into the memorial service from afar today. I am flooded with beautiful memories of Reg and am so thankful to have known him, and to have heard all the beautiful words about him today. Shortly after starting my first class with him as an undergrad, I remember thinking how cool it was to bump into my professor at the IV co-op, and to see him transporting all his groceries back home to Goleta on a bike, no less! Every interaction with Reg felt inspiring, whether that inspiration came from his infectious joy, his compassionate example, his deep and generous listening, or his equally deep and lightning-quick mind. He was and is a blessing to this world, zichrono livracha. Thank you, Reg, for being the best of humanity and for being a fierce advocate during one of the toughest times in my life. You didn’t have to do that, but it’s just who you were/are. Your spark is present in so many wonderful people, in academia, and in the heart of what it means to work towards a better future. The ripples of your goodness are incalculable.
Comments:
  • Please make sure you've written a comment before it can be published. If you prefer to remove your comment, you can delete it.
  • Sorry, we had some trouble updating your comment.
Helping hands

In lieu of flowers

In lieu of flowers, consider a gift to Professor G. Reginald Daniel Memorial Fund.
G. Reginal Daniel and friends…
2017, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
G. Reginal Daniel and friends at the Critical Mixed Race Studies conference
G. Reginald Daniel and Paul S…
2017, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
G. Reginald Daniel and Paul Spickard at the Critical Mixed Race Studies conference
Flower

Send flowers

Share your sympathy. Send flowers from a local florist to Reg's family or funeral.
Paul Spickard, G. Reginald Da…
2017, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Paul Spickard, G. Reginald Daniel, Maria P.P. Root, and Cindy Nakashima at the Critical Mixed Race Studies conference
Comments:
  • Please make sure you've written a comment before it can be published. If you prefer to remove your comment, you can delete it.
  • Sorry, we had some trouble updating your comment.
Steven F. Riley and G. Regina…
2012, Japanese American National Museum, North Central Avenue, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Steven F. Riley and G. Reginal Daniel on a panel at the Mixed Roots Film and Literary Festival
Reg was a wonderful colleague and friend to me during my time at UCSB.  The news is still raw, but today, nothing but smiles in remembering fond (and fun) memories with a good friend.
Having Reg as a professor, mentor, and member of my dissertation committee was such a gift, and by this I mean not necessarily his expertise (which we all know is profound), but his understanding of my mixedness. As a mixed heritage Mexican American in a Chicanx Studies PhD program, it was he who first understood my insistence that first- and second-generation mixedness is experientially and conceptually different than mestizaje. Sitting in his office, with the low, warm lamp light contrasting the winter evening beyond the window, being able to say this and not have it questioned allowed me to finally exhale. The power of that moment will always stay with me, and I've aspired to pay that forward with my own students. Reg's scholarship, including his promotion of my own work; his mentorship; his voice and laugh, are all such gifts. I miss him deeply.
Reg once told me that he started talking when he was six months old. The first word he said was "light."
Bill Bielby
2003, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, USA
By the time Reg received his Ph.D. in 1987 he was already recognized as a leading activist advocating for the interests of people of mixed-race heritage and identity and was doing pioneering work in the emerging field of mixed-race studies. For the next decade he supported himself travelling the rocky road of soft-money lectureships, at UCLA, and, starting in 1992, my first year as department chair, at UCSB, with some other stops along the way. It wasn’t until 1998, my last year as chair, that Reg, at last, achieved the career stability and academic recognition that comes with a tenure track position. By time he was promoted to tenure in 2003 he was widely recognized as one of the most distinguished scholars in the field that was coming to be known as critical mixed-race studies. By then, his academic colleagues were finally recognizing that he was not just that guy whose quantitative teaching evaluations were off the end of the scale, but that indeed he was, and had been throughout his academic career, and extraordinarily talented and dedicated teacher and mentor.  The testimonials here from former students speak to that remarkable quality of his.
I am deeply grateful to have had the opportunity to know Reg. From the moment I first met him during my job interview until our last correspondence, he was a wonderfully supportive and kind friend and colleague. I loved his great sense of humor, which brightened up everything. He was unmistakably devoted to students, to our department, and to his important work in the area of Critical Mixed Race Studies. He has left a major legacy--Reg was an inspiration to me and to so many others. My deepest condolences to his family and friends. We miss you, Reg. 
I think it is safe to say there will never be anyone quite like Reg!  We loved him for his eccentricities, and he never failed to inspire us with his clever sense of humor,  his intellectual breadth, and his deep passion for teaching and research on multiraciality.  My condolences to his family, friends, colleagues, and students.  I cannot imagine our department without Reg.  But he leaves a powerful legacy for future students and faculty in the area of mixed race studies.
My condolences to Reg's family. I first met Reg when I applied for a faculty position at UCSB. We were both Brazilianists and we had both done research in what was then the nascent field of Mixed Race Studies.  I will always appreciate Reg's passion and his intellectual commitments to  this area of research. Reg had so many talents. I will miss his sense of humor, intellectual verve,abd his spirit of generosity towards students and colleagues.  
He passed away way too soon. He was very supportive and took an interest in my work that I want to continue to the Critical Mixed Race studies field. I am so sad that he is gone, but his work will continue to speak volumes!

My heart is hurt to learn that Reg is no longer with us.  He was a beautiful soul and inspiring scholar.  He was never on any of my committees, but he deeply impacted my time in graduate school and was a constant support.  I often told him that I considered him my informal mentor and I envied students whose research more closely aligned with his expertise.  

Reg was always there to cheer me on and provide comfort and words of encouragement during my time in grad school and we kept in contact a bit after, too.  In especially difficult periods, when it seemed like probably nobody else was even awake, he'd respond to my distressed emails and offer to talk things through with me.  As a fellow night owl, I really appreciated that.

I loved bumping into Reg on his bike arriving at the co-op or around town.  I appreciated that he kept his office cozy with soft light and music in the background.  He was classy like that.  We talked about the more personal side of being mixed race a lot and  I felt seen by him in a way that was meaningful.  He remembered my birthday, unaided by social media, and could advise me on whether or not my prospective romantic partners could vibe with my Libra-on-the-cusp-of-Scorpio-energy.  I remember arriving to his office frazzled and him insisting on untangling my computer cord of its knots, which was such a random thing, but I still remember it.  I can also remember dining with him at the Alumni house and the Thai restaurant in town, where we shared our last meal together before I moved away.  

I'm super grateful for all of our conversations and your support, Reg.  You left an amazing legacy and will be missed beyond measure.  

Comments:
  • Please make sure you've written a comment before it can be published. If you prefer to remove your comment, you can delete it.
  • Sorry, we had some trouble updating your comment.
Sadly, I never got the opportunity to meet Reg in person. I have been inspired by his very influential publications, and I was fortunate to have been able to exchange some email messages with him over the years, particularly over the past year regarding an article that he contributed to a Special Issue on mixedness that I am guest-editing. Reg was one of the first people I thought to invite as a contributor. He was a pioneering scholar of Critical Mixed Race Studies, and from what I’ve read, a great teacher and mentor. I have tremendous admiration and appreciation for all that he has contributed to the field and to academia in general. Reg was a great thinker and scholar, and, even more importantly, he always seemed like such a lovely person to me: very good-humored, charismatic, thoughtful, and considerate. It was really heartbreaking to learn of his sudden passing, only a few months after our last email exchanges. I send my sincere condolences to all who loved him and whose lives he touched. Rest in peace, Reg. 
Shared a heart Red heart
Comments:
  • Please make sure you've written a comment before it can be published. If you prefer to remove your comment, you can delete it.
  • Sorry, we had some trouble updating your comment.
Dr.Daniel was a writer I discovered in my research for my doctorate from Alverno College. We talked and I invited him to be on my dissertation committee. It is one of the best things I’ve done. His confidence made a difference, provided support and momentum. I successfully defended 10/28/22. He gave me the gifts of empathy and understanding, but he also understood my mind in lieu of my life experiences. Though I only knew him for a short two years, Dr. Daniel and I understood each other as scholars, and why Critical Mixed Race Studies is so vital to the American idea. As a scholar, he was a stickler for detail and precision. As a coach and friend, he reminded me of Old World gentility and graciousness. This kind man is a loss to many. I am only one of the mourning masses.  /millie
My condolences to Reg's family. I first met Reg over a phone call sharing my interest in multiraciality and how I could actually study mixed race in academia. While I didn't end up at UCSB, I found my way through a connection to the Multiracial Network, my masters (eventually my PhD) and I would often see Reg either at the CMRSA conference or NCORE. At NCORE over the years, I had the pleasure of sitting on a panel with Reg and learning from his sessions as an audience member. I always found his depth and knowledge of the critical mixed race studies emerging field as so inspiring and fascinating. I very much will miss seeing Reg at these conferences and will miss his importance voice in the field. I pay deep respect to his legacy and memory and will continue to consult his amazing scholarship and work to for ongoing motivation and urgency to continue to bring voice to the mixed race experience.
Comments:
  • Please make sure you've written a comment before it can be published. If you prefer to remove your comment, you can delete it.
  • Sorry, we had some trouble updating your comment.
I took his Multicultural Identity class in Spring 2018. Absolutely life-changing. One of my most impactful classes at UCSB. He provided me with the tools to create a new and improved perspective of my multiracial identity. Definitely sad to hear this sad news.
I met Reg soon after I began my dissertation fellowship at UCSB's Center for Black Studies. We shared so many lovely moments of conversation, moviegoing, and laughter, and that led to co-authoring an article as well. I am so sad to hear of his passing and send my heartfelt gratitude to his spirit and strength to his beloveds. 
I had the privilege of attending to two of Prof. Daniels' classes and even being the course reader for one. Reg was the first professor (in my four years of college) that I could call a friend. I always loved his energy, enthusiasm and passion for education. As selfish as this might be, I hope we would have had the chance to hang out more. Rest in peace and power Reg, thank you for everything and everyone you have ever impacted, myself included.

Want to see more?

Get notified when new photos, stories and other important updates are shared.

Get grief support

Connect with others in a formal or informal capacity.
×

Stay in the loop

Prof. Reg Daniel